L’HISTOIRE

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Etymology:

The term cunnilingus is derived from the Neo-Latin words for the vulva (cunnus) and tongue (lingua). Additionally, there are numerous slang terms for cunnilingus, including drinking from the furry cup, carpet munching, muff diving etc… Several common slang terms used are giving lip, lip service, or tipping the velvet; the latter is an expression that novelist Sarah Waters argues that she "plucked from the relative obscurity of Victorian porn”. A person who performs cunnilingus may be referred to as a cunnilinguist.

Cultural and Religious Significance:

Cultural views on giving or receiving cunnilingus range from aversion to high regard. It has been considered taboo, or discouraged, in many cultures and parts of the world. In Chinese Taoism, cunnilingus is revered as a spiritually-fulfilling practice that is believed to enhance longevity. There are Japanese and Chinese scrolls, dating back to 200 BC, that feature cunnilingus drawings, indicating that humans were equally interested in female pleasuring alongside male gratification. Such celebrations would indicate that oral sex was an activity encouraged and pursued, and it was in some cultures. Oral pleasuring was a revered, spiritual practice amongst Chinese Taoists. Sixteenth century Japan’s shunga artistic movement celebrated such sensual pleasures with woodblock prints depicting lovers performing cunnilingus in an effort to collect a female’s fluids in an ejaculation bowl.

In modern Western culture, oral sex is widely practiced among adolescents[42] and adults. General statistics indicate that 70-80% of women require direct clitoral stimulation to achieve orgasm. Shere Hite's research on human female sexuality reports that, for most women, orgasm is easily achieved by cunnilingus because of the direct clitoral stimulation (including stimulation to other external parts of the vulva that are physically related to the clitoris) that may be involved during the act.

Hinduism

The religious historian Mircea Eliade speaks of a similar desire to transcend old age and death, and achieve a state of nirvana, in the Hindu practice of Tantric yoga. In Tantric yoga, the same emphasis is placed on the retention and absorption of vital liquids and Sanskrit texts describe how the male semen must not be emitted if the yogi is to avoid falling under law of time and death.

Taoism

Cunnilingus is accorded a revered place in Taoism. This is because the practice was believed to achieve longevity, and the loss of semen, vaginal, and other bodily liquids is believed to bring about a corresponding loss of vitality. Conversely, by either semen retention or ingesting the secretions from the vagina, a male or female can conserve and increase his/her ch'i, or original vital breath. In Taoism:

The Great Medicine of the Three Mountain Peaks is to be found in the body of the woman and is composed of three juices, or essences: one from the woman's mouth, another from her breasts, and the third, the most powerful, from the Grotto of the White Tiger, which is at the Peak of the Purple Mushroom (the mons veneris).
- Octavio Paz. Conjunctions and Disjunctions. trans. Helen R. Lane. 1975.

According to Philip Rawson (in Paz, p. 97), these half-poetic, half-medicinal metaphors explain the popularity of cunnilingus among people: "The practice was an excellent method of imbibing the precious feminine fluid.” But the Taoist ideal is not just about the male being enriched by female secretions; the female also benefits from her communion with the male, a feature that has led the sinologist, Kristofer Schipper, to denounce the ancient handbooks on the "Art of the Bedroom" as embracing a "kind of glorified male vampirism" that is not truly Taoist at all. Ideally, by mingling the male and female liquids the Taoist aims to reconcile opposites and to recapture the mythical time that existed before the division of the sexes, the primordial time of the original ch’i.

Trivia:

In the words of Dr. Lauren Streicher, Associate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Northwestern University, your vagina and beer have something in common, and it isn’t just that they both make men have bad judgment! Believe it or not, the pH of common beer is actually similar to the pH of your vagina. Remember that a healthy vaginal pH is 3.5 to 4.5 and the pH of beer is 4.5. As shown in the episode of Windy City Live featuring Dr. Streicher, a healthy vaginal pH is closer to that of beer than water, soy milk and egg whites. H2: Now your versed, why not rehearse: Eating Out Tutorial